Register Register Register

If you've been enjoying a lot of time off this summer, a new analysis has good news: All that vacationing might lengthen your life.

The finding comes from an updated review of data in a 1970s Finnish heart health study that followed roughly 1,200 middle-aged men in their 40s and 50s for almost four decades.

All of the men were believed to face a higher than average risk for heart disease, and half of them were given five years of advice regarding diet, weight, exercise, blood pressure, cholesterol and triglyceride levels. The other half was not offered any special health guidance.

Now, roughly 40 years later, it turns out that men who got the heart advice but took only three weeks or less of vacation time each year were 37 percent more likely to die, compared to those who took more than three weeks off a year.

Study author Dr. Timo Strandberg said the key takeaway from the findings is that "in general, vacation -- if you enjoy it -- is good for health."

Why? Strandberg said that while the investigation didn't track the men's stress levels, "stress, with multiple effects in the human body, would be a good candidate" to explain why those who didn't take much vacation had worse outcomes overall.

Strandberg is a professor at the Universities of Helsinki and Oulu and at Helsinki University Hospital in Finland.

He was to present the findings Tuesday at the European Society of Cardiology's annual meeting, in Munich, Germany. Such research is considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

The long-running Finnish study initially found that those who received heart health advice saw their risk for heart disease plummet by 46 percent by the end of a five-year period, compared with the group that got no lifestyle advice.

But a second analysis -- completed roughly 15 years later -- unexpectedly revealed that more people in the advice group had actually ended up dying (by 1990) than in the non-advice group.

Now, the third analysis -- which tracked mortality up until 2014 -- found that over the first 30 years following the study launch (until 2004), the death rate among those who had been given heart advice continued to be consistently greater than among those given no advice.

The death rate between 2004 and 2014 did, however, even out, Strandberg noted.

To better understand the earlier mortality pattern, Strandberg decided to examine vacation habits during the period of time when death rates were higher among the guidance group (1974-2004).

That led to the discovery that during that 30-year time frame death rates were 37 percent higher among those in the heart guidance group who had taken only three or fewer weeks of vacation each year.

Source: www.drugs.com

Share:
Leave a Comment
MEDICAL DISCLAIMER

All the contents present on the website are solely for informational purposes. Thereby, the information on the website isn’t meant to be a substitute for professional medical advice, treatment, and/or diagnosis. Please seek professional advice from a doctor/physician for queries regarding a medical condition. Chawla Medicos, by no means, are responsible for consequences caused due to avoiding professional medical advice.
Above information is meant for: Wholesalers, Suppliers, Doctors, Hospitals, Clinics, Resellers, Medical Institutions and Pharmacies.